Daydreaming

My morning inspiration comes in large part from two daily emails: Danielle LaPorte’s Truthbombs and the Harvard Business Review Management Tip of the Day. Yesterday’s tip was just so good I have to share it. It is a reminder of something both my parents have always emphasized, under different names: the importance of daydreaming (as Mom calls it), and of teatime (as Dad calls it). And if even Harvard says it’s ok to, let’s take the time to let our minds wander.

“Thanks to our smartphones, tablets, and laptops, it’s easy to be working all the time. But our devices can actually make us less productive by interfering with an important mental process: daydreaming. To be effective, our brains need opportunities to be “off,” which is hard when we’re constantly taking in new information through our devices. And research has found that letting our minds wander facilitates creativity and long-term thinking. If we’re facing a challenge that needs new ideas, we’re more likely to find some if our minds drift away from the problem for a while. So the next time your mind starts to wander, let it. Don’t check your favorite website or your email. Instead, walk to a window and think about the people and cars going by, close your eyes and notice the sounds around you, or go for a short walk. And remember: leave your device behind.

Adapted from “Zoning Out Can Make You More Productive,” by Josh Davis.

As stated in Harvard Business Review Management tip of the Day, Monday September 20, 2015.

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