Sun, sunscreens, sunburns…

The sun is (or at least should be!) shining, it’s that time of year. And May is Skin Cancer Awareness Month. All in all, it is time to review sun, UV, sunburns and sunscreens. Here are some tips to help you separate fact from fiction when it comes to this burning topic (no pun intended…).

Myth: I don’t need to wear sunscreen on a cloudy day.

Truth: Up to 85% of UV can penetrate light cloud cover

Myth: I have a tan, so I won’t burn.

Truth: Having a tan is only the equivalent of about SPF 4, and does not mean you won’t burn.

Myth: I am young, I don’t need to worry about skin cancer.

Truth:  Melanoma (skin cancer) is the number one cancer seen in ages 25-29

Myth: I need more vitamin D so I shouldn’t wear sunscreen.

Truth: You only need about 10 minutes of sun exposure per day to get enough vitamin D for your wellbeing. (And remember, even with sunscreen on you will get sun exposure).

Myth: Getting just one sunburn won’t really harm my skin.

Truth: A single sunburn in childhood will increase the risk of melanoma. And it can take up to 5 years for the skin to fully recover from a single sunburn!

Myth: Tanning beds are sage.

Truth: UVs matter inside and out; indoor tanning may increase the chance of getting melanoma up to 75%

Myth: Sunscreen will block all UV

Truth: “Sunscreen is not enough” as said Dr. Karen Burke. Remember to layer your antioxidants under your sunscreen, so you have a second line of defense (try our Diode 1 + 2 serums for your face, and our Alexandrite gel for neck and bust for your body).

Other interesting facts about the sun and sunscreens…

UVA versus UVB:

  • UVA damage DNA and lead to skin cancer (damages not initially visible to the naked eye)
  • UVB lead to redness and ultimately wrinkles (the visible sunburn effects)

Chemical versus physical sunscreens:

  • Chemical sunscreens absorb the UV rays. These are typically lighter sunscreens.
  • Physical sunscreens (really known as sunblocks) reflect UV rays. Ingredients such as titanium dioxide and zinc oxide are used in physical sunscreens. The usual “thick, white, sticky” feel of sunscreens comes mostly from physical sunscreens.

Water-resistant versus waterproof sunscreens:

  • Water-resistant sunscreens maintain their SPF levels after 40 minutes of water exposure
  • Waterproof sunscreens maintain their SPF levels after 80 minutes of water exposure

The sun’s reflective powers are great:

  • 17% on sand
  • 80% on snow

If you want to learn more about the sunscreens I like, watch this week’s segment on Let’s Talk Live. And remember, no sun is safe sun. And you earn the skin you’re in!

Summer beauty tips

Last night, in our Georgetown showroom, we hosted lovely group of people from the Harvard Club of DC – all alumni of my alma mater who live in the DC region. The goal: networking, enjoying delicious wine and treats, and to discuss summer beauty tips.
Summer… = sun, heat, humidity, “smaller” clothes…
So here goes:

Ada's travel beauty tips

If you know anything about me, you know that I travel a lot. I love to travel, I travel for work, and for business. Some of you have been asking me about my travel beauty tips. So here goes.

Typically, the day before I get on a plane, I will apply our Kantic Mask. It helps to nourish my skin (airplane air is so dehydrating), and gives me a nice glow – i.e. makes me look like I travel less than I do.

Legs, legs, legs

Last night I had a debate with my dear friend Kelly about tights. Or stockings, however you prefer to call them. I love dresses and skirts year round, but I hate tights. So in the winter, my legs are always cold. She was telling me about fabulous cashmere thigh highs… I might have to try those.

Our conversation made me think about legs, and then of course my mind wandered to products, as it always does. And I realized that I use 4 Alchimie Forever products on my legs and feet! While you might think about taking care of your legs during the summer, if you are like me and don’t like tights then you might want to think about them during the winter also. After all, ’tis the season for holiday parties and short cocktail dresses.