The Podcasts That Make Me Smarter

I started listening to podcasts to make it easier to run on the treadmill, one of my most hated things, yet something necessary if I am going to stay in shape on the road. These days, I listen to them while flying, while driving, and sometimes even while getting ready in the morning.

Here are some of my favorites. Please share yours!

The Knowledge Project by Shane Parrish.

This is the first ever podcast I listened to. The Angel Philosopher episode with Naval Ravikant is still one of my favorites ever, I have now listened to it twice.

Living It by Kelly DiNardo and Amy Pearce-Hayden.

This is a new podcast, started by my friend Kelly, a project that came out of her book Living the Sutras. I love the theme of “living life on purpose” and particularly enjoyed this week’s episode with Michelle Gielan.

How I Built This with Guy Raz by NPR.

These are interviews of entrepreneurs and how they built their business. I got turned on to this podcast because of an episode featuring Marcia Kilgore and her story about Bliss – and have been addicted ever since. The episode with the two founders of SoulCycle is also amazing.

Freakonomics Radio by Stephen Dubner.

This podcast definitely takes me out of my comfort zone and introduces me to topics I don’t typically think about. One of my favorite episodes is How to Catch World Cup Fever, from this past summer.

And here are some podcasts I downloaded but have yet to listen to…

Best of Both Worlds by Laura Vanderkam and Sarah Hart-Unger. I got turned on to this one after reading Laura’s book Off the Clock, which I loved.

The Business of Fashion. This is one of my favorite daily newsletters (I wrote about these here). I just need more hours in the day.

What are your favorite podcasts? And when do you listen to them?

ada polla shows redness on her face

Skincare Tips For Stressful Situations

I feel fortunate that most of the time, my skin is not a cause for stress or concern. I am nice to it, and in return it is nice to me. We happily coexist. Sometimes, however, my skin likes to remind me that it is the boss of me, and that I need to be extra gentle with it. It can’t use words, so it “speaks” to me with zits, redness, dry patches, and dark circles. Here are my go-to tips and products for stressful skin scenarios.

Reaction from another product.

  • Case in point, the very unflattering photo of me here, trying out a mask (that shall remain un-named) on half my face to compare the effect with our Kantic brightening moisture mask. Instant redness and irritation.
  • The best thing to do is nothing, or apply a very calming, trusted moisturizer. I used our Kantic calming cream and was fine the next morning.

Travelling.

 Stressed.

  • Stress will come out on your skin in various ways. For me, I get dry red patches in symmetrical areas, often in my wrist area. This may sound bad, but Neosporin is then my go-to – the kind with pain relief properties.
  • Our Dry skin balm also helps calm the inflammation of stressed skin and is ideal if your stress comes out as dry flaky patches (body, not face).

 Hungover.

  • The eye area is key on such mornings, and our Tightening eye contour gel works miracles in lifting and opening my tired eyes.
  • A tiny bit of Kantic Brightening moisture mask mixed in my favorite moisturizer will help give my skin an all-day glow to counteract the “morning after dullness.”

 Sunburnt.

  • Think healing, gentle, anti-inflammatory, and anti-redness. Our Kantic Calming cream helps reduce redness and calm the heat in your skin, and you can even use it on your body.
  • If you peel, do not “pick” at your skin. Once the redness is gone, our Gentle refining scrub will help accelerate the skin’s recovery.

 Breakout before a hot date.

  • Never, ever, ever pick. It only makes it worse.
  • The Mario Badescu Drying Lotion is a miracle worker. Ideally overnight, but even if it is for an hour or so before said “hot date,” it will help.
  • Dab a tiny amount of concealer to hide the redness, but don’t overdo it as that will only attract attention to that area.

My Rendition of Vanity Fair’s ‘My Stuff’

Clothes

Beauty products

Living & inspiration

Brigadoon 2019

I am sitting in Salt Lake City airport with a breathtaking view of the snowy mountains, and a heart and head filled with the knowledge, connections, experiences of Brigadoon 2019, which took place over the last three days. When people ask me to describe Brigadoon, I respond with “it’s a conference on thinking.” The speakers are varied and non-industry specific, and the topics range from policy to personal development and everything in between.

As I continue to process everything I learned, here are some of the concepts swirling around in my brain.

From Marc Ross, Founder of Brigadoon.

Replace FOMO (Fear of Missing Out) with JOMO (Joy of Missing Out). Meaning, it’s ok to do your thing, to take time off, to disconnect. It’s ok to say “no.”

From Brook Hazelton, Chairman, WineCredit.

The typical laws of supply and demand don’t necessarily apply to art market. An artist needs to be prolific to be able to command high prices at auction. Said another way, a large supply is typically needed for the artist to become famous enough to generate auction-level interest.

From Michael Rivera, Executive Director, Founder Central Marshall School of Business.

The magnetic pole of homophily: the tendency of people to seek out and be attracted to those similar to themselves. Our friends are like us, our business partners are similar to us. This is comfortable, but it is not optimal. Differences in backgrounds, cultures, opinions, education, and more, are additive to strategic thinking.

The magnetic pole of quality: equal is not necessarily always fair. People want fair.

From Kelsey Durkin, Director of Program Management, Personify.

Comfort is the enemy of growth. (Interestingly, this is a different way of saying that homophily is not optimal.)

Leaning into the pain is the only way through the pain.

From Wendy Jones, writer.

Purpose over pleasure. Working your purpose will lead to long-term happiness, whereas living your life with a focus on immediate gratification and short-term pleasure will not.

“Elegance is an attitude.” RIP Karl Lagerfeld.

Today (tomorrow, by the time you read this), I am sad. I never had the pleasure of meeting Karl Lagerfeld. I never had the privilege of working with him. I never had the good fortune of spending time with him. And yet, today I am mourning his passing, and I know I am not alone.

Scrolling through Instagram and the news, I am reminded of everything I associate with his larger than life persona. Luxury. Democracy. European style. Irreverence. “Unf***ablewith-ness.” Handsomeness. Ponytails. Sunglasses. Cats. Black and white.

One day, I promised myself, I would own a Chanel jacket that he designed. When I was “a proper successful adult.” I’m still working on that.

Before then, I would go to H&M to purchase one of his limited-edition designs. I got there too late, too many times, everything was always sold out. I loved how mad he got with H&M for not releasing enough of these designs: “They did not make the clothes in sufficient quantities. I find it embarrassing that H&M let down so many people… I don’t think that is very kind … It is snobbery created by anti-snobbery.” 

One day, I wished to be so cool I would wear big black sunglasses even when it was grey or dark outside, because they would protect me. The only Chanel item I own is a pair of big black sunglasses – I will wear them tomorrow even though snow is coming to DC.

Today, along with so many, I am reminded of his wisdom which have been ever-present in my head – for so many years.  

On everything:

“If you are cheap, nothing helps.”

On self-awareness:

“I am very much down to earth. Just not this earth.”

“I take myself with me everywhere.”

On self-care:

“Don’t sacrifice yourself too much, because if you sacrifice too much there’s nothing else you can give, and nobody will care for you.” 

On work:

“I’m a working-class person, working with class.”

“I get inspired when I’m working, it’s my engine.” 

“It’s up to you to make every day as perfect as possible – it’s a question of will and discipline.” 

“Why should I stop working? If I do, I’ll die, and it’ll all be finished.”

“My thing is to work more than the others to show them how useless they are.”

“Don’t look to the approval of others for your mental stability.” 

On change:

Change is the healthiest way to survive.”

“I like to reinvent myself. It’s part of my job.”

On books:

“Books are a hard-bound drug with no danger of an overdose. I am the happy victim of books.” 

On age:

“Youthfulness is about how you live, not when you were born.” 

On beauty:

“Beauty with character ages better than perfection.” 

“Vanity is the healthiest thing in life.”

 On fashion:

“One is never over-dressed or underdressed with a Little Black Dress.” 

“Sunglasses are like eyeshadow: They make everything look younger and pretty.”

“Trendy is the last stage before tacky.” 

“Sweatpants are a sign of defeat. You lost control of your life, so you bought some sweatpants.” 

And just for fun because these make me giggle in the most politically incorrect way:

“Yes, some people say to me ‘You’re too skinny,’ but never a skinny person says that to me.”

“Having adult children makes you look 100 years old. I don’t want that.”

“Anyone who is not at least trilingual is a hick.” (Note to self: I’m a hick.)

RIP Karl Lagerfeld.

Stop Adding Sugar to Your Diet to Look Younger Longer

Tomorrow is Valentine’s Day so a post on sweets (aka sugar) seems timely (it was that or a red roses rant).

Summary: Sugar is a (skin) aging accelerator. Stop adding sugar to your diet to look younger longer.

Sugar is hidden in almost everything we eat – including fruits and vegetables, yogurt (except plain), processed meats, salad dressings, sauces (yes, the best tomato sauce has added sugar), bread, pasta, crackers, wine, and more. Knowing this, we are all getting our “recommended sugar dosage” by eating and drinking “normal” substances – so no need to add juice, soda, sports or energy drinks, cereal, desert, cookies, muffins, smoothies, or other sugar-forward foods in our diet.

I am not speaking about the correlation between sugar and tooth decay, excess weight, diabetes, heart disease (and those connections are real). I am speaking pure skin here – excess sugar makes you look older sooner. Here is a summary of the pesky process called Glycation.

  • Excess sugar molecules attach themselves to proteins including collagen
  • Said collagen loses its strength and flexibility
  • Skin thus looks slacker, more wrinkled, less plump

Ironically, the culprits in this process are called AGEs – advanced glycation end products (compounds that result from a combination of sugars and proteins). And yes, they age you. For a more in-depth understanding of the impact of glycation on aging, read this article.

Here are easy tips to incorporate in your daily lifestyle today:

  • Stop drinking sugar – fruit juice, sodas, energy drinks, sports drinks  
  • Forego pre-made or store-bought salad dressing, at home and at the restaurant; instead, have oil and vinegar on the side
  • If you must have desert, do it the European way and eat fruit and nuts (and cheese!)
  • Put down that piece of chocolate – unless it is dark chocolate (packed with antioxidants), small, and the only one you will enjoy this month.

Conclusion: Sugar is a (skin) aging accelerator. Stop adding sugar to your diet to look younger longer.